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Fall Protection Training

Mar 21st, 2013Comments Off

Units Price
  • Reduce training investment
  • Minimize time/productivity lost
  • Lower your cost of compliance
1-10 $32.95
11-25 $30.95
26-50 $27.95
51-100 $25.95
101-500 $22.95

60 minutes of training can save weeks of lost time.

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Fall Protection Training Program

Nearly 20 % of all lost time injuries can be attributed to falls in the workplace.

The majority of falls occur on the same level, while others involve falls to a lower level. The latter usually resulting in more serious injuries or death. Falls are preventable.

Our Fall Protection Program will provide participants with an understanding of their responsibilities when working in areas where fall hazards exist, the use of and inspection of the required equipment and the critical controls necessary to reduce the risk of a fall. Upon successful completion, a certificate will be issued automatically.

Modules

  • Fall Protection and Fall Arrest Systems
  • Fall Hazards and Controls
  • General Responsibilities
  • Inspection of Equipment
  • Fall Arrest Systems
  • Donning a Harness

Fall Protection in Ontario

Employers in Ontario are required to train workers to use fall protection systems and other personal protective equipment correctly while performing these jobs. Workers who wear fall arrest devices while working, and those who may perform rescue activities, should also be training in how to make certain that their personal protective equipment is properly fitted and worn so that it performs as intended.

This Fall-Protection online training course will teach all workers how to protect themselves by way of guarding, travel restraint and finally fall arrest. A practical component on inspection, donning and doffing the harnesses are included with this course.

 

Company Director Fined $90,000 Under OHSA After Workers Killed

Jul 21st, 2012Comments Off

Toronto, ON – Joel Swartz, the director of Metron Construction Corporation, a Toronto constructor, was fined $90,000 after pleading guilty to violations of the Occupational Health and Safety Act after four workers were killed and another worker was seriously injured.
On December 24, 2009, six workers were on a suspended work platform, also known as a swing stage, at a construction project on Kipling Ave. in Toronto. The swing stage collapsed and fell 13 floors, killing four of the workers and seriously injuring another worker. The only worker properly attached to fall protection was held by the lifeline and pulled to safety.

A Ministry of Labour investigation found that the deceased workers had not been properly tied off to a lifeline, and had not been properly trained in the use of fall protection. The swing stage had been overloaded and it was later determined to be defective and hazardous.

Joel Swartz pleaded guilty under the Occupational Health and Safety Act to failing, as a director, to take all reasonable care to ensure that:
■workers did not use a defective or hazardous swing stage
■the swing stage was not loaded in excess of the weight it was meant to bear
■workers were adequately trained in the use of fall protection by a competent person
■Metron Construction Corporation prepared and maintained written training and instruction records for each worker

Metron Construction Corporation was convicted of criminal negligence causing death and was fined $200,000 in relation to the same incident. Metron’s conviction was pursuant to amendments to the Criminal Code of Canada relating to workplace safety which have been in force since 2004. The criminal charges were laid by the police.

The fines were imposed by Judge Bigelow of the Ontario Court of Justice. In addition to the OHSA fines, the court imposed a 25-per-cent victim fine surcharge, as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The surcharge is credited to a special provincial government fund to assist victims of crime.

Other defendants facing charges stemming from this incident are still before the court.

OHSA and Criminal Code Convictions Arising From 2009 Toronto Swing Stage Accident

Jun 18th, 2012Comments Off

The tragic death of four workers falling on a construction site on Christmas Eve 2009 in Toronto, Ontario garnered nationwide media attention and quickly became known as one of the highest profile workplace accidents in Ontario, if not Canadian history. The accident spurred a historic, comprehensive review of Ontario’s occupational health and safety system and led to amendments to Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act. It also resulted in both regulatory and criminal charges being filed against the parties involved in the construction project.

On June 15, 2012, in a Toronto courtroom, Metron Construction entered a guilty plea to one charge of criminal negligence causing death under the Criminal Code as amended by Bill C-45.

At the same time, its President pleaded guilty to four contraventions of Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA). Each charge alleged that the President failed, as a company director, to ensure that Metron complied with the OHSA and its regulations. The charges the President pleaded guilty to were:
•two counts under section 26.2 of the Construction Regulations including failing to take reasonable care to ensure a worker using a fall protection system was adequately trained; and that there were proper records of training (including names of workers and dates of training);
•one count under section 93 Construction Regulations of failing to take reasonable care to ensure a suspended scaffold was maintained in a condition that did not endanger a worker or was defective or hazardous; and,
•one count under section 134 of failing to ensure that a suspended platform complied with all aspects of the Consstruction Regulations.

The President has not as yet been sentenced. A joint submission (a proposal put forward jointly by Crown and Defence) has been placed before the court for a fine of $22,500 per charge, for a total of $90,000. The court does not have an obligation to accept the joint submission but it is rare for courts to depart from one.

Similarly, Metron has not yet been sentenced on its guilty plea to the criminal negligence charge. Under the Criminal Code there is no limit on the amount of a fine that may be imposed upon a corporation. The Crown has sought a penalty of $1 million dollars. The defence has not yet completed their submissions on sentencing. Sentencing proceedings have been put over to a later date.

The Accident

On December 24, 2009, six workers employed by Metron were working on a swing-stage scaffold while repairing balconies at a high-rise apartment building in Toronto. Five of the workers were not using fall arrest systems. The swing-stage collapsed. The fall tragically killed four workers and seriously injured another. A sixth worker’s fall was halted by the lifeline of his fall arrest system. Both the Ontario Ministry of Labour and the Toronto Police investigated the accident.

The Charges

Following its investigation, the Ministry of Labour laid a total of 61 charges against multiple parties under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (“OHSA”). Among the charges, thirty were laid against Metron, fifteen charges were laid against its President and another eight charges against a Company supervisor. Swing N’ Scaff Inc., the company that provided the swing-stage being used at the time of the accident, was also charged with four OHSA offences and its Director was charged with an additional three OHSA offences.

Following its own investigation, the Toronto Police also laid numerous criminal charges. Metron, its President, and a supervisor were each charged with four counts of criminal negligence causing death and one count of criminal negligence causing bodily harm. Criminal charges against the supervisor are still pending and a preliminary hearing commenced on May 7, 2012 in Toronto and is ongoing. In this hearing a judge will assess if there is sufficient evidence for the matter to proceed to a criminal trial.

Commentary

This case is historic as it represents the first corporate guilty plea in Ontario under the Criminal Code as amended by Bill C-45 in 2004. If imposed, a corporate sentence of one million dollars will represent the highest penalty for criminal negligence causing death for a workplace accident in Canadian history. The only other prior corporate criminal negligence conviction in such a matter, on a guilty plea in 2008, was Transpave, resulting in a fine of $100,000.00 in Quebec.

The proposed fine against Metron’s President will, if imposed, set a new high water mark for a sentence against any individual, let alone a director and officer under an OHS statute in Canada.

Aerial Platform and Scissor-lift

Apr 21st, 2012Comments Off

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AS REQUIRED BY THE “OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT AND REGULATIONS”

OHSA- Section 25(2)(A), (D) and (H)
- Regulation 851 – Section 51(2)
- Regulation 213 – Section 26

Competent operators must know, not only how to operate the particular class of Elevated Work Platforms to which they will be operating, but also be aware of the hazards associated; they must be able to operate the equipment in a manner that protects both their own safety and the safety of others in the workplace.

Participants will recieve training in the following elements:

  • Operator Qualifications and Legislated Requirements
  • Hazards Associated with the operation of Elevated Work Platforms—People, Equipment and Environment
  • Pre use inspection of the equipment
  • Safe Operation of Elevated Work Platforms
  • The Safety Rules that need to be followed
  • The Requirements for Fall Protection Equipment
  • Inspection of Fall Arrest Equipment
  • Operator Evaluation on the equipment to be used (if available)

MOL Blitzing PPE in October!

Sep 10th, 2011Comments Off

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) reduces or prevents a worker’s exposure to occupational health and safety hazards. The equipment acts as a barrier to protect workers from blows to the body, loud noises, heat, chemicals, infections, and electrical and other hazards. PPE can refer to protective clothing, helmets, shoes, goggles, respirators and other safety gear worn or used by workers.

In October 2011, the Ministry of Labour will focus on PPE during an enforcement blitz at industrial and health care workplaces across Ontario.

Some duties of workplace parties

Employers, supervisors and workers have duties and responsibilities under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and its regulations. Workplace obligations include, but are not limited, to the following:

An employer must:

  • Ensure the PPE provided is used by the worker [OHSA clause 25(1)(d)]
  • Provide and maintain in good condition all prescribed PPE [clauses 25(1)(a) & (b)]

A supervisor must:

  • Ensure a worker wears the PPE required by the OHSA and its regulations [clause 27(1)(a)]
  • Ensure the worker uses the PPE required by the employer [clause 27(1)(b)]

A worker must:

  • Wear any PPE required by the employer [clause 28(1)(b)]
  • Report to the employer or supervisor any known missing or defective PPE [clause 28(1)(c)]
  • Not remove or disable any PPE required by the employer or by the supervisor [clause 28(1)(d)]

Priority areas

Although the blitz will mainly focus on head, eye and foot protection at industrial and health care workplaces, inspectors may also address other types of PPE, including fall, respiratory, skin and hearing protection.

Inspectors will check whether the requirements related to the selection, use and care of PPE, and worker training in the use of PPE are being met by all workplace parties, as specified in the OHSA.

Industrial workplaces

In industrial workplaces, inspectors will focus on PPE that protects the eye, head and foot, and address any other hazards they may find.

Inspectors will focus on safety gear used by workers in the following sectors:

  • wood and metal fabrication
  • vehicle sales and service
  • food and beverage
  • wholesalers
  • education

Health care workplaces

The blitz will also focus on hospitals, long-term care homes and homes for residential care. The blitz will check for safety gear being worn or used by non-clinical staff in the following departments of health care workplaces:

  • dietary services (nutrition and food services/kitchen)
  • housekeeping/environmental services
  • maintenance shops, the central sterile supply and laundry departments of a health care workplace

Inspectors will look for equipment that protects the:

  • head
  • eyes and face
  • lungs
  • hearing
  • hands and feet

Sections 10 through 15 of the Health Care and Residential Facilities regulation (O. Reg. 67/93) – regarding PPE – will apply to applicable workplaces

Working at Heights Training

Jun 13th, 2011Comments Off

Fall ArrestEmployers are required to train workers to use fall arrest systems and other personal protective equipment correctly while performing these jobs. Workers who wear fall arrest devices while working, and those who may perform rescue activities, should also be training in: How ascertain whether their personal protective equipment is properly fitted and worn, so that it performs as intended.

This Fall-Protection online training course will teach all workers how to protect themselves by way of guarding, travel restraint and finally fall arrest. A practical component on inspection, donning and doffing the harnesses are included with this course.

Fall Protection Training Course

Our Fall Protection Program will provide participating employers and employees with:

  • an understanding of their duties and responsibilities when working in areas where fall hazards exist;
  • the use of and inspection of the required equipment and;
  • critical controls necessary to reduce the risk of a fall.

Upon successful completion, a certificate will be issued automatically.

Fall Protection Training

Company

Jun 13th, 2011Comments Off

health and safety training online course in TorontoOccupational Health and Safety Training

Occupational Health and Safety Training is our business. Our clients rely on our expertise for their OH&S training needs. We strive to stay current with ever changing legislation in order to bring our clients and their staff the information needed to comply with Occupational Health and Safety Legislation and maintain a healthy and safe workplace. We have training programs,which include such topics as: WHMIS, Fork Lift Operator Certification, Propane, Transportation of Dangerous Goods, First aid and CPR, Fall Arrest, Respirator and Fire Protection.

Proudly Serving the Greater Toronto Area

Workplace Health and Safety Services are available for our clients and include such issues as: Audits, Workplace Inspections, Fire Safety and Evacuation Plans. We cater to the Greater Toronto Area including Mississauga, Brampton, Vaughan, Markham, Pickering and Ajax.

We have recently added On-line Safety Programs to assist our clients with such issues as WHMIS and TDG.

Custom Home

Jun 6th, 2011Comments Off